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The importance of “Follow Up”

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by Mike Ladge

This is probably the most important part of it all. It isn’t good enough to just have some meetings or discussions without knowing what the next steps are going to be for each side. If you tell a sponsor that you are going to put their logo or name on your banner, shirt, web site, or do a Facebook post, then do it right away. Don’t wait until they have to ask you about it.

If someone emails you, email them back. If they call you, call them back. If they text you, then text them back. If you are too busy, then tell them you are busy and let them know when you can call them. I make it a point to never leave the office without returning every email and phone call for the day, no matter how late it is. The last thing someone wants to hear is “I didn’t have time”. It takes less than a minute to text someone that you will get back to them later.

I hear countless stories of players who cancel last minute or don’t show up to tournaments, and this reflects badly on them. If you know you have to fly to a tournament, book your flight as soon as you can when flights are often less expensive.

When you get a reputation of being flaky, it is hard to change it. Racquetball is a very small world and word spreads quickly. Even though people may not say anything, you will often lose out on things you could have had the opportunity to be involved in once you have a bad reputation.

Unfortunately, what I see often in the world of racquetball is a lack of people who will actually do what they say they are going to do. “Say what you are going to do, and then do what you said you are going to do.” Sounds simple but very few people do this.

We can learn a lot from Head’s Doug Ganim, whom I have had the pleasure of working with the past few years. When he tells you something is going to get done, it is done and if he can’t do it, he will tell you right away. It is not an accident that he is able to put on an event like the US Open every year. If more people treated racquetball and their playing careers/business like Doug has, who knows where the sport and many players would be today.

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